eBooking  .Marketing  .Publishing
Login  |  My Account  |  Order Status  |  Help
Home  ›  Fiction  ›  Web of Broken Vendetta
Web of Broken Vendetta
by Joshua Egbon   (Author)
Read First Three Chapters

Prologue:
THE CONFESSION BEADS

Mexico, 1906
“Did you kill the man?” the queen asked for the third time with a stern look.
But the man kneeling down before her gave his third ‘no,’ with greater determination and unbending resolution.
Finally, the queen told the accused murderer that he would be tried with the Confession Beads.
“Jueza, I told you that I didn’t kill him,” the accused said, neither fearing the Confession Beads nor the judge who also was called ‘queen.’
The queen then took the necklace of wooden beads in the sight of the audience from a small wooden box that was carried by her daughter who was seated by her side, and rose from her chair to wear it around the neck of the accused murderer whose hands were tied at his back. Then she asked him again in a commanding tone: “Did you kill him?”
The man, who was kneeling down, lost his fighting spirit immediately he was worn the Confession Beads, and he answered, “Yes Jueza, I killed him.”
This sudden change in reply made everyone around to give a cry of surprise.
But the queen continued by saying, “Tell us how.”
The man, who had lost control of himself as he is now under the power of the magic necklace, said, “I got married to my wife two years ago, and love her very much. But during the last four months I noticed that she was no longer respecting me the way she once did. Yesterday I returned from my farm by noon because of the sudden illness I developed while working. But to my greatest surprise, I saw my neighbour Mr. Eduardo on bed with my wife in my house. I was mad with him, so I used the cutlass I took to the farm to kill him…” With his head bowed, he continued, “My wife was scared to the bone when she saw what I did, and she pleaded for her life to be spared. I immediately threw down the cutlass on realizing what I did, and told her that she have to keep sealed lips. We hid the body in my house, but I brought it out at midnight to bury it in the forest. When I was close to the forest, with the body covered in a cart, I saw some hunters, so I quickly threw the body on the floor and took to my heel.
“Early this morning, some persons came to my door. They claimed that I was seen yester night with the dead body of Eduardo. I denied this; so they took me to you, Jueza.”
Having said those words, the queen removed the magic necklace from his neck, and said to him, calling him by his name, “Arturo, you just confessed that you killed Eduardo.”
“Lie,” Arturo yelled.
But the queen said, “Ask these persons that are here, you did confess that you killed him because he slept with your wife.”
Arturo looked at the faces of the eighty-plus persons that came to watch his confession, and from their look, he could guess that he confessed those words. He looked at his wife, who was carrying their child, and saw tears running down her cheeks. They planned never to speak the truth even if they are caught, but now he had confessed everything before the villagers. He feared that death is what awaits him, so he cried, “Please Jueza, forgive me. I did kill him because he went into my wife.”
Mrs. Arturo burst into tears, but could say nothing: for she knew the rule—that no one pleads on behalf of a guilty man, but all allows the queen, who also was the judge (jueza) to give her judgement.
The queen then went to her seat with the Confession Beads in her hand, and she gave her judgement: “Arturo, you are guilty of murder. But since you killed because the man committed adultery with your wife, I will not pronounce a death sentence on you: but you shall be beaten an hundred strokes—ten each day for the next ten days. Not only that, the responsibility of taking care of Eduardo’s wife and children shall be laid on you for the next fifteen years.” And to the people around, the queen said, “Bring a whip, and give him the first ten lashes.”
A whip was brought, and Arturo, who was happy his life was spared by the judge, allowed his shirt to be removed, and he received the first ten strokes in the presence of everyone. After this, they all departed from the village hall where this judgement was carried out; the queen being the first to leave.
Guadalupe the sixteen-year-old daughter of the judge, who sat on a stool close to her mother, holding the box which houses the Confession Beads, gave a breath of relief when she heard her mother’s judgement. She was happy that the murderer wasn’t condemned to death because his wife was robbed from him; and she was proud of her mother.
Everyone had departed before Guadalupe left with the wooden box where the necklace was. She then went home in haste to keep the wooden box, but sneaked out immediately to the forest; there she stood by the edge of the forest waiting for her lover. A nineteen-year-old boy did jump down from a tree, and walked straight to her, and said, “I’m glad you came as arranged. Let us go into the forest before passersby see us.” With those words said, he took her hand, and led her deeper into the forest to a farmhouse.
In the farmhouse, the boy asked, “Did you watch the execution of the accused murderer?”
“Mr. Arturo was a murderer, but he was not to be blamed,” Guadalupe said, and narrated the confession of Arturo, and concluded with: “My mum gave a righteous judgement.”
“What about Arturo’s wife was she judged?”
“No, she wasn’t because it wasn’t her matter that brought the people together, but her husband’s.”
“But that does not justify your mother: for she had sent many to early graves as a result of the so-called Confession Beads. This ought to stop.”
“It is tradition, and cannot be stopped. This method of finding the truth has been with our people for centuries now.”
“I know that. But the world is advancing, and so should our people. Other methods should be used to find out who is guilty in a crime.”
“What method?”
“Science should be employed.”
“Science! It is almost blind, and cannot see far. Will science make a hardened criminal to confess his crimes as the Confession Beads does?” Guadalupe asked.
The boy didn’t give an answer, instead he said, “That is not my problem: for I do not fear the Beads the way I fear that one day the girl I love will one day condemn some innocent people to death.”
Leaning on his chest, Guadalupe called her lover by his name, and said, “Tradition demands it. Since the Beads were given to our forefathers by the river goddess, my family was chosen to be the judge, which made every first daughter of my family or wife of the first son in the absence of a daughter to carry the act of a judge of our people by using the Beads to find the truth. As for the condemnation of people, only the guilty are condemned; and that is justice.”
Not satisfied by that answer, Manuel said, “Be honest to me my love: don’t you think that the Beads lie.”
Guadalupe shook her head, and told Manuel that the innocent ones, even if they wore the necklace, would still retain their confession of being innocent.
At last Manuel spoke his mind, saying, “I will like a wife that is no Jueza.”
Guadalupe sprang her head from his chest at the hearing of this, thinking he is calling an end to their relationship. But Manuel called, “Baby, don’t be scared. I will be leaving this village soon, and I want you to run away with me.”
“Run from my parents in order to be with you! Where are you going to, for you’ve never stepped out of this village before?”
“I want to go to the United States. A friend of mine who lives there has arranged for my coming.”
“Do you have papers?”
“I don’t have now: for he arranged to smuggle me in.”
“Smuggle!” Guadalupe exclaimed.
“I won’t remain like that forever: for I have plans, and one of them is that I will get the right papers once I am in. You may not have to go with me immediately, but will come once I have gained balance; probably at the end of one year.”
Guadalupe thought about this for a while, and said, “My parents will arrest you when they find that you are hiding me. You know they forbid our love. Your father is a minister, and my mother is a pagan jueza. The day I honoured your invitation by coming to your father’s church, I heard him preach about unequal yoke with ‘pagans’. That is what you church people call us. I don’t know who told my mother that I went to church that day, and she shouted at me for disobeying her.
“Our village is divided: some are followers of our tradition, while others worship your God—Jesus. My mum told me that our Colonial masters tried to bring Christianity to our village long ago, but failed. My mum and your father were friends even before my mum became a judge, and he believed greatly in the power of the Confession Beads; until one day your father travelled out of the village, and returned after several years with a wife and some strangers in order to establish a new religion. Then my mother was the new Jueza, and your father preached to her to abandon the tradition of the Mayans, and embrace his Jesus. A church was built, and your father was made the minister. He was able to convince the sick, poor, and criminals to follow his God; and since then he and my mother split ways.
“Will you go against your father’s preaching and be married to me?”
With eyes burning with love, Manuel gave three resounding ‘yes’; and Guadalupe said, “You sound just like the man that was accused of murder today, who stood firm on his answer, until the Confession Beads were placed around his neck, and he gave a different answer. What will your answer be when the Confession Beads of trial and opposition is placed around your neck?”
“Yes,” Manuel answered. Then he asked, “Will you run to me even against parents wish?”
“I will,” replied Guadalupe. “I will run to you even if it requires me to go through the fire. When will you be going? Does your father know that you will be leaving?”
“I haven’t told him yet, and will not until I have gotten my green card. He said that I cannot marry you until you leave idolatry and become a Christian. I know it will be hard for you to escape the position of a jueza since you are the only daughter of your father, and you are bound by law and custom to become the next one. This is why I brought the escape plan. As for the time of my departure, it will be next month, after I have gathered enough money.”
“Your father will be mad at you: for not following his dream for you of becoming a minister like him. I thought you wanted to inherit his church.”
Manuel laughed, and told Guadalupe that he wasn’t called by God to become a minister. “The call that came to me is to love you; and I’ve decided to obey it.”
Those words brought smile to the face of Guadalupe; and Manuel wrapped his hand around her neck and kissed her…stopped, and said, “I will love you till I die,” and gave her a long passionate kiss.
Two days later, people were gathered in the village hall in order to witness an accused thief’s confession, and the judge’s judgement. When Guadalupe drew near the hall with the box that houses the Confession Beads, she was surprised at the crowd of people she saw—for inside and outside were filled with people. Never before had she seen much people gathered to witness a confession. She then went to take her seat on the stool in front of the hall, which was opposite the witnesses, and waited for the arrival of her mother.
The sight of Pastor Pedro and his wife, who sat at the front row, made her to be surprised, because the pastor who preached against using magic to find the truth, was there to watch a magical display. But she soon got the idea that something was not right. ‘Maybe,’ she said in her heart, ‘he is being called to question concerning preaching against tradition’… ‘No,’ she said to herself, ‘If it is a matter that concerns the preaching of Pastor Pedro, my mum would not have told me to bring the Confession Beads. Or maybe it is needed to find out if truly he had been preaching against our tradition.’
While Guadalupe was battling over why Manuel’s father was in the hall to witness a case she does not have knowledge of, her mum the judge came, and sat beside her on the armchair by her left, which was called the Judgement Seat. Then the whole crowd fell into silence.
With authority the queen commanded, “Bring the criminal.”
Guadalupe almost ran mad at the sight of the criminal: for it was her Manuel that was brought wearing only a trouser, and having both hands bound at his back.
The cause of the gathering was first made known to everyone by the queen, who said that Manuel was caught stealing, and refused to come and be tried by the Confession Beads, but he was forced down by angry mobs. “Where are the witnesses?” the judge called.
Two men then came out, and testified that the minister’s son stole from their store: for both of them were business partners.
But Manuel shouted, asking, “What did I steal? Did you see me with anything or you are doing this to bring my father’s name to the ground?”
One of the men then said, “Immediately you left our store when you came to price a shirt, our money got missing.”
“Go and look for your money elsewhere,” Manuel told the men.
“You were the only one that came within the hour that the money got missing,” the bald-headed man said.
Without being invited to speak, Manuel’s father raised a hand, and said, “My people, I greet you all. You know that I have always preached against using sorcery to find the truth. I know many may be surprised to see me here; but I came in order to let you all know that my son is innocent.” Turning to the queen, he said, “Jeuza, I want you to know that those you sent to bring my son, said that you told them that if Manuel do not come out from the house, that you will burn the church of the living God. If that order was truly from you, I want you to know that you didn’t do well. I won’t stand against you trying him by whatever means you choose, provided it is a righteous one.”
The queen was furious, and she said, “You know the law of the land: it is either you come under the power of the Confession Beads when you are accused of anything, or you carry your church and pack out of the land. My husband the chief said he won’t have problem with they that choose to be Christians in the land, as long as you all agree to be tried by the Confession Bead. So don’t think that you or any Christian is oppressed in any way. Tradition must be obeyed. Now do you agree that your son be tried with the Confession Beads or you pack out of the land?”
After thinking for a while, the minister answered, “Try him.”
This answer shocked Guadalupe, but the words of her mother threw her off balance: for she said to the hearing of everyone, “Let some persons not think that I used a strange power (which I don’t possess) to cause Manuel to confess what he did not do. Some of you know that my daughter and Manuel are friends; and my daughter shall be the next Jeuza after me: for this cause I shall allow her to wear him the Confession Beads, while I will give the verdict.” And to Guadalupe, she said, “Wear him the Beads.”
Guadalupe trembled, not because it was her first time to wear an accused the Beads in the hall, but because she was about to wear it on her best friend. She opened the box slowly, and removed the necklace, and dragged her feet to Manuel who was kneeling, and then she asked with trembling lips in low tone, “Did you steal…the money?”
“I didn’t,” Manuel answered.
Turning to her mother, Guadalupe declared in a loud voice, “He didn’t.”
But the command from her mother was, “Wear him the Beads.”
Guadalupe hesitated, and the crowd shrilled that the Confession Beads should be put to play; and the girl was forced to wear it around the neck of her lover, but not without whispering, “I love you!”
The queen took over from here by asking Manuel from the Judgement seat where she sat if he stole money from the store of Miguel Angel and Ricardo.
“I did,” Manuel answered like one who has lost his senses.
Guadalupe gasped in surprise, covering her mouth with a hand as she drew back.
But her lover continued: “I want to travel to America, but have little money. I stole offering from my father’s church but the money was not enough, so I went to steal money from Miguel Ricardo’s boutique in disguise of going to buy a shirt from them which I never bought.”
At the hearing of this, Manuel’s father left the hall in annoyance, leaving behind his wife; Guadalupe also ran out crying.
The Beads were still around the neck of Manuel when the queen gave her verdict. She pronounced him guilty, and his judgement is death by hanging; “Others will learn from this,” she said, and left the hall.
Manuel’s mother screamed on hearing this, but she could not save her son.
Guadalupe sat in her room mourning over the foolishness of her boyfriend. She didn’t want to be disturbed, but the persistent knocking of her brother that evening Manuel’s case was decided, made her to open for him, moreover her father sent him to call her to come and eat. She had not heard anything about the judgment given by her mother, as she thought it would be a double restoration of the money and flogging. But something within her prompted her to ask if Manuel was beaten. Her brother shook his head, and told her the truth.
“Noooo…!” Guadalupe cried, and ran to meet her mum at the dining table.
The rest of her brothers and her father were there with her mum; and Guadalupe said, “Mum, how dare you kill a boy who stole in order to better his life: but you spared a man who murdered another man. Did you do this because of a personal vendetta against Manuel’s father or you did it in order to punish me because I love a Christian?”
Seeing this, her father told her to sit down, and be quiet: but she could not as she burst into tears, and ran back to her room, and bolted the door. But her father went after her, and requested that she open for him. This she did. He tried to console her. But all she said was, “I don’t want to be a Jueza; I don’t want to be a murderess.” And for the first time in her life she seriously gave the thought of becoming a runaway.

CHAPTER ONE
MANNES’ MEMOIR

USA, January 22, 1913
“Once I confirm the truth, I will introduce the Confession Beads to Hope, and tell her she can know the dark secret of her husband, which he is hiding from her; just by making him to wear the necklace of wooden beads, and commanding him to confess his secret. I believe she will not hesitate to take the necklace from me. And the consequence of Mannes’ confession shall be my revenge on him,” the maid said in her heart.
Princess Guadalupe Gerardo whose desire to avenge Mannes drove her to his house to become his maid, entered the master bedroom with a bucket of soapy water and a napkin. But instead of cleaning it, she had started to delve into information she was not privy to. She was looking for a confirmation of what she heard about her master, before she could strike, and be gone. She went to the chest of drawers and opened the top drawer, and went through every document in it. Then she saw her master’s marriage certificate and birth certificate of his son, Joseph. On seeing the dates in both papers, she shook her head and smiled. The middle drawer contains a notebook, which she tossed aside. She looked at the bottom drawer, and saw hundreds of letters; but didn’t care to read any.
Next, she went to the wardrobe, and searched; but didn’t see anything that interested her. So she started arranging the room again. But at a second touch on the notebook she found in the middle drawer, she decided to see what is written in it. On opening the first page, she saw these words: MANNES’ MEMOIR.
“Good!” she said with a nod.
The book was written in longhand. With a great desire to know all of her master’s secret, she sat on the bed, opened the next page, and started reading by 11.15 a.m.:

Part I: Hope Returns
I sat in the train station wearing a brown coat, with a newspaper in my hands, and my glasses on, waiting for the only girl I ever loved that had played a trick on her parents. It was a simple trick. Hope, my love wrote to her parents that she will be arriving on the 24th, but she came on the 23rd so that I can pick her from the station, and ride her home.
It was 3:50 p.m. on 23rd of September 1902, and the train was to arrive by 4:00 p.m. As I sat waiting for her, the memory of the past flooded my mind.
It happened that when I was sixteen years old, I was caught at home romancing 13 years old Hope in my father’s house. I must confess that I didn’t go beyond some passionate kiss, so I didn’t break her virginity before I was caught by my dad, who returned home without my expectation. And he became furious, or best—mad.
‘I’m sorry,’ I pleaded, but ran away from home, and wasn’t seen for three days. When I finally returned, I discovered that my parents were anxiously looking for me. They accepted me with an open heart, but told me that I must apologize to Hope’s parents, and earn their forgiveness as well.
This I did.
Hope’s father was a wealthy farmer, who owned a large land where so many palm trees were planted. I knelt before him asking for his forgiveness. As everyone or almost every young man would say, I told him that it was the devil that made me do it. But I said something else; it was: ‘I promise not to touch her until we are married’
The man laughed, and called me his son. He told me to sit down. Hope and her mother were called. Hope is not their only child, she has an elder brother and a younger sister.
‘You may marry her later in life,’ he told me. ‘But as you promised, never you touch her before marriage. The day you do, I will kill you. Her mum is my witness.’
I stayed clear of the girl, but didn’t stop dreaming of her. I even had a dream that our wedding was being done in the church, but when the pastor asked if any in the congregation had a reason why we two should not be joined together in holy matrimony, a woman I didn’t know rose, and said, ‘They are too young.’ When I awoke, I penned down that date.
But two days later, I was given a shocking news by my friend, Robert Thompson, that Hope had travelled out of the village. To where? He didn’t know. This was true. And for the next three years, I did not see her in the village.
Although I didn’t see her in the village, she never stopped writing and also sending me her pictures. She was in her aunt’s place in Pennsylvania. She told me about how her father advised her to be a good girl, and not to go into any romantic relationship with any boy until she was eighteen. I also wrote to her that we would get married when we are of age.
Despite the limit placed on us by her parents, I still visited her twice during her stay in Pennsylvania. I still have about forty of her letters.
But before her arrival on the 23rd of September 1902, she wrote two letters: one was to me, and in it she wrote that she would be arriving on 23rd; but the other was to her parents, informing them that her arrival would be on the 24th. Her excuse to her parents for arriving on an earlier date was that she changed her mind: this was her trick. For this reason I was in the train station in Augusta, Maine, waiting to carry her on a chariot that I hired, that was pulled by two white horses; I chose white horses because Hope had earlier confessed to me that she preferred white horses.
Joy came into my heart and this was seen on my face when I heard the sound of the train coming. In no distant time, the train stopped, and people started pouring out of it. I folded the paper and rose in order to see when my love would come out.
She came out wearing a grey sunhat, and a grey suit. She was carrying a brown suitcase, and was looking like a lady and not a girl. Immediately I saw her, I ran to embrace her, and kissed her. I took her to the chariot like a princess, and told the chariot rider to take us home.
Now let me introduce myself. My name is Mannes West. I was born in the year 1883. I have two siblings, which are both male. My elder brother’s name is Vance, while my younger is Jonathan. Our father, West was the owner of a ship, but he often travels with the ship and acts as the captain. I was born in the village of Pine Field, which is close to the city of Augusta in Maine, USA.
My friends described me as one that is too bookish, I love music and was always seen with one newspaper or the other. At age three, I and my family travelled to Mexico, before returning when I was ten years of age. As a result of this, I could speak Mexican Spanish. At age eleven, I and my family moved to the western part of the country and settled in California where my father’s ship docks. At age fifteen, I and my brothers moved to our village, leaving behind our parents.

Part II: Operation Restore Hope (ORH)
My village would have been insignificant if the great organization Operation Restore Hope was not formed in it in January 22, 1784 by the trio—Bunyan a faithful officer that fought in the American war of independence, Mr. Richard, and Mr. Kennedy. Through the years the organization had witnessed series of leaders all by appointment. But in 1903, the famous year that Wilbur and Orville Wright invented the airplane, Ernest Benson, the leader then, organized an election, which was won by Jack Bright. His success could be traced to the underground work of his two friends: Robert Thompson, and me, Mannes West.

Part III: Marriages
We three were fond of each other, had different religious beliefs, and were willing to play all sorts of tricks in order to play into the quarter of the three girls.
The three girls were: Hope, Vivien, and Elizabeth. The first was shy, a lover of music and art. But since Hope returned to the village, I didn’t make it known to the world that I loved her. Vivien loves honesty, but she’s cunning and a lover of story. She lived with her wealthy parents who died in an accident both in one day, before she went to live with her aunt. Later, she left the house of her aunt for that of her grandmother who lived in Pine Field: this was how she came to my village. Elizabeth did live with her aunt from age four before moving to her parents’ house at age eight, she loved caring for children, loved being surrounded by flowers, and she was a good novel reader—who wasn’t scared of the volume of a book.
These girls made fun of Jack Bright before he became the head of the organization, as he memorized the history of the organization: thinking it would be a pass mark for him to win the election. He wrote many quotes of the past and present leaders of our nation, and memorized them. At times, he gave one of the three girls the book of quotes, for them to see if he was correct in reciting them. He also used this means to enter their midst. The major opposition Jack received came from a contestant who said he was a lazy youth, who did not want to work in his father’s farm, and also lacked ideas. But Jack said that Ernest Benson was younger than him when he was made head of the organization;he also said that he had not only learnt the ways of the past leaders, but had also learnt democracy from Abraham Lincoln. And the people applauded him for this.
I, Jack and Robert were crafty and did anything that would make the girls laugh.Jack loved to be good and help others, he was born of very poor parents and they could not afford three meals a day; as a result of his poor background, he could not attend the university. His father only had a small land and a few palm trees before his death; as a result of this, Jack Bright vowed never to be poor like him, and so worked hard, but he was an apostate of the Christian faith.
Robert Thompson spent most of his time reading Christian books, he was a Christian and reverenced God. He was brought up by a Christian mother who gave her best to make her son what he was; his love for God was high, and he was always seen with a pocket Bible.
‘Let’s watch who will be the first to win their friendship,’ Jack Bright said to me and Robert as we talked about the girls.
We had always sort for ways to enter into the girls’ quarter: but the girls on the other hand, made jest of us as they spoke about our trick. They said that I always come with my big eye glasses, having a newspaper in my hands as if I had important news to tell them. So they nicknamed me “Mr. Newspaper”. For Jack Bright, he always came with matters concerning the organization to them and his book of quotes. Robert Thompson always wanted to tell them Bible stories, so they loved him more than I and Jack
The key of ‘Strong Hold’ was handed over to the new leader, who immediately divided all those working under him into different departments. He had the financial, the maintenance, the law and counselling, and the agricultural department. Each department had a head, and there was a higher group which comprised three persons that oversaw all other matters. After this group (which comprised three overseers), the next was the assistant leader, followed by the head of the organization.
Vivien composed a story of three big rats, and anytime I and my two friends came with all sorts of tricks, they would say, ‘There is always a minimum of three ways to catch three big rats,’ and the girls would laugh. Her story is this: ‘There was a young girl of about twelve years of age, who was sick, and went to the hospital. On getting there, three doctors attended to her and gave her some tablets; but she said that one of the tablets do irritate her. So a doctor, who wanted to be smart, took all the drugs back and pretended as if he had changed the tablet the girl hates, but he only added one which is sweet. Then he said to his fellow doctors, “There is always a way to kill a rat.”’ But the girl said within herself, “There is a minimum of three ways to catch three big rats.” The doctors in Vivien’s story represent me, Jack and Robert; while the girl represents her group.
Strategies were made by JB, as he was popularly called, on how the organization can best be ruled:
Firstly, he always had a meeting with all male heads of every home once in a month, so as to know the minds of the people and their needs.
Secondly, he did his best in providing only the essential things that the people needed so as to make them happy.
Thirdly, he appointed a particular day which was the 21st of January (a day before the organization was formed). He made that day a day of compulsory sanitation, while the day after it, a public or work free day. The village was called ‘Fair Haven` during his days.
While he was the head of the organization, Robert Thompson, who was a descendant of Richard (one of the men that formed the organization,) became his assistant at age nineteen. JB was aged twenty-one when he became the organization head. He was only a month older than Ernest Benson before ascending to the position of the head. Both Jack Bright and Robert Thompson did their best to raise the organization as I was still in the university. They had no secret, spent time into the night thinking and planning on what to do to make the organization move forward. They also read the history of the organization, and noted some challenges faced by the first leaders and how they overcame the challenges.
The two friends were determined to bring out their best for the organization. Jack Bright told his dream concerning the organization to Robert and me; and how he wanted the organization to spread to different parts of the country (a dream that the past leaders could not achieve). Robert Thompson also told his dream to Jack which he had for the organization and they both sat down planning on how to make their dreams come true.
Two factories were built on the large land bought outside the village. They were: wine press and a factory for oil production. People then moved to the place where the factories were located. After a long time, a factory farm was built in the village, and wind mills were also built. All these things and many more brought people to the village. Soon the village became richer and the place where the first two factories were, which was called ‘Little Home,’ was the main source of wealth. During the days of JB, the village was also called “Minute Eden” as it almost became a town. Jack Bright was given a title —Just the Best (JB).
In January, 1909, Jack Bright got married to Elizabeth at the age of twenty-nine, while his wife was twenty-five. And they had their first child in the month of May, 1910. Robert Thompson also got married in the year 1909 a few months after the wedding of Jack, at the age of twenty-seven, while his wife was twenty-four. He married Vivien, and the wedding was conducted on his birthday. His first child was born the following year, and was called Kelvin.
In the year 1910, I said, “Wow! This is great news…” as I came to Hope with a newspaper in my hands and glasses on.
‘What is it?’ Hope asked.
‘Millikan had discovered the charge of the electron; now its mass can be calculated,’ I told her.
‘But you are not science inclined, why should it intoxicate you?’ The girl asked.
‘Well, I never stop to bother my pretty head about little matters. But I discovered something better three months ago and have been preserving it.’
‘What is it?’ Hope asked.
I then brought out a small box, looked at the shy, pretty face; brought out a ring from it, and said, ‘I LOVE YOU’. In the month of February, 1911, we got married. I had rounded up my education and was twenty-eight years, while Hope was twenty-five.

Part IV: The Bone Woman
Two weeks into our marriage, Hope and I were having fun—riding in the wood. She was on a white horse while I was on a brown one. We had gone far from Pine Field, when we saw an old woman on a bush path carrying a big bundle of sticks. We helped her. While she climbed on my wife’s horse, I carried the sticks, and she led us to her house. She then invited us for tea, but I refused, and told her that my wife and I must return before sunset.
‘What if I show you your future?’ she told us. ‘You won’t pay a dime.’
‘Really!’ Hope said with interest. ‘Let’s have a glimpse of it.’
I was forced to go in because of Hope: for I didn’t believe in soothsaying.
The cottage was dirty and old, and also full of bones. She lived alone and has two children—a male and a female. As she told us, her son served in the army and she wouldn’t have allowed him to join if he had not seen his future. He won’t meet death there.
She brought out a big clay pot and poured water in it. She did some incantation, and said, ‘Only one person should look into the pot.’ I told my wife to look first.
Hope looked, but saw nothing until the woman cast a spell and three bones into the water. And as she cast each bone, she said:
‘The bone of an eagle to see far. The bone of a bat to see in the dark. The bone of a cat to see at night and day.’
My wife seemed to be enchanted as she looked into the pot. She was carried away for a while. But after about five minutes, she screamed, and I held her, and carried her from the pot.
‘What did you see?’ the woman asked.
Hope was shivering. Then she said: ‘I saw a cat, a hawk, a little squirrel, and a snake living together in a house peacefully, until they were divided because of food shortage. They then left the house, and went separate ways in search of food. While the squirrel was walking one sunny day in search of his food, he met the cat, who was so hungry, that he decided to eat the squirrel. But the squirrel ran for his life into a hole. But the snake was in the hole, searching for its food. On seeing the squirrel, it chased him, wanting to eat him. The squirrel ran out of the hole through another end, and climbed a palm tree, having ripe palm fruits. The snake waited on the ground. All seemed well for the squirrel because he had come in contact with food on the tree. But in the midst of this jubilation, the hawk came, and stole the squirrel. It would be his meal.
‘Next I saw myself in a maze riding on a horse with a little boy who was on a pony. There was a dead man on the floor, whose belly was facing the ground. The man was lying in a pool of blood. I didn’t see his face. We were trying to get out of the maze, when we saw some men carrying knives and guns wanting to kill us; and I lost the boy in the maze. We couldn’t get out.’ Hope burst into tears there.
The old woman listened attentively. And when my wife was through, she went to bring different bones—the bone of a squirrel, a hawk, a cat, and a snake fang. These she threw on the floor after chanting some words I did not understand. She opened her eyes, and saw that the bone of the squirrel was closest to my wife. She then shook her head, and gave the interpretation: ‘The one to be in danger shall come from you. He is the little squirrel. As the snake, hawk, and cat have their reason to kill the squirrel, so shall those that will desire to kill the one that will come from you have their reasons. But their reason will be centred on ‘survival’—killing the child will be hinged on their survival. The child shall be caught in a tangled web of deaths. The first and second vision that you saw have the same meaning. But the second made the first very clear. The maze represents a “Web.” The dead man you saw represents the “Vendetta.” When I say web, I mean a complex series or complicated pattern of things with many connecting part—nexus. There will be so many reasons why your enemies will want your child dead. These reasons will interweave themselves to form a WEB OF VENDETTA. The boy you saw is your son; he is also the little squirrel. The men you saw are assassins.’
It was now my turn to look into the pot, I never wanted to, but my wife persuaded me despite the fact that I told her that our destinies were in our hands. I then looked for about seven minutes. After which I told her that we should go home.
‘Let’s first hear what you saw, and have the interpretation,’ Hope told me.
But I laughed, and said that we can only listen to her interpretation on one condition: it was for the old woman to tell me what I saw.
‘I can only interpret what you see,’ the old woman told me.
I chuckled, and refused. I then plainly told her that her power is limited; and told my wife that we should leave.
The old woman then told us that tea was ready.
‘Thanks. We are late.’ I said to her.
‘Thanks for your help once more,’ she told us
But on stepping outside the house, the heaven opened and it rained heavily, so we returned to the old woman’s house.
This time we were forced to take tea. We spent three hours there until the rain was over, and left by 8:15 p.m.: for I couldn’t spend the night there despite her persuasion.
In the three hours of our stay, she lit a lamp, told and showed us many things. Her house was full of bones, they were of different sizes and shapes, and were gotten from different animals. She told us the significance of each bone, and said that many people come to her for healing, and they called her the Bone Woman. She ground bones and mixed them with some roots to heal people. She showed us the bones of deer, antelope, wolf, sheep, goat, rat, lizard, dog, and different birds. Some of these bones were hanging freely from the ceiling in the parlour. She also told us that the bone of an antelope brings good luck.
My wife then asked, ‘Does the bone of a sheep make a stubborn boy humble?’
The woman laughed, and said, ‘It is used to make cough medicine.’
‘You interpreted what I saw. Can’t what I saw be averted?’ Hope asked.
‘It can,’ the woman replied with a husky voice. ‘Wait while I go and bring something that will make what you saw to be averted.’ She then went into a room.
She returned with a pendant made of bone, which had a rope that passed through it. It was an amulet. She told my wife that the bone was that of a fox, it had a sharp end. My wife thanked her for the gift.
Although she brought food to us, we did not eat, but left immediately after the rain; and spent the night in an inn, the following day we returned home.
At home I told my wife not to believe anything she saw and was told by the Bone Woman; and that it was the devil’s trick.
But she asked, ‘What did you see?’
My reply was: ‘I saw that I married another woman, and we had a wayward son. I don’t believe her for two reasons: one, I can’t divorce you for any reason. Two, even if,-’ I paused, and continued, ‘you die, God forbid, I will not marry another woman. I know the trick of the pot and water. It shows you only evil and not good; that is what the devil does, he shows you your greatest fear.’

Part V: Joseph Mannes
My wife was eight months pregnant when she gave me the doctor’s news. She told me that ‘The doctor said I might not be able to give birth safely except through operation. His reason is that there are some injuries in my womb, which had brought about the complication. He said if I would deliver through operation, I will live, while the child might die, and I might not be able to have another child. If I chose to go without operation, I will die, but the child would be safe. Now the choice is ours to make.’ Soon tears filled her eyes. But I consoled her with encouraging words, and suggested that we visit another hospital.
Every hospital and doctor we visited diagnosed the same thing. So I and she were forced to take a decision; which came from the love I have for her: that came before any child. It was for her to undergo the operation. I told this to my elder brother.
As a result of inadequate equipment, Hope was taken out of the village to the city of Augusta where the operation was to be done. But she could not bear the thought of living with me without a child. So she did change my decision on the day the pain of labour started. She told this to the doctor: ‘Please tell my husband that I chose to give my life for him to have a child that will preserve his name on earth: this is why I chose to go through labour. Tell him that I love him.’Against my wish was this decision made.
My elder brother was with me in the hospital. He, being a Christian missionary had fasted and prayed for God to intervene. That day in March 19, 1912, my wife delivered without operation, and the doctors and nurses were surprised. ‘This must be the hand work of God; it’s a miracle, a case in a thousand!’ they said. In fact, the doctor called the child ‘Miracle,’ while a nurse called him ‘Wonder.’
We chose to give our child a name starting from ‘K’ and we chose the name ‘Kirk,’ but my father gave the child his middle name—‘Joseph,’ which means Increase. It happened that Jack, Robert, and I were to follow a letter, and we chose letter ‘K’—so Jack’s first son was called ‘Keith’, ‘Kelvin’ was chosen for Robert’s son, but my father turned the table around and called his grandson Joseph.
Jack Bright and Robert Thompson presented gifts to the child. Baby Joe was prayed for by his uncle the missionary during his dedication. I, who had no interest in church, went to church on that day as my elder brother who had always told me to serve God, advised me to thank Him.
Mrs. Guadalupe closed the book and kept it back in the chest of drawers. Tears rushed down her eyes during and after reading it. She then hurried to her room, and brought out the Confession Beads. As she looked at it, her mind reflected back to the day she collected it two weeks ago from her father: for she travelled to Mexico because of it. She could still recall the voice of her father asking her who she wanted to use it on. And her reply had been a lie: ‘to find out who stole some money in the company where I am working in the States.’ She was told to return it once the truth had been exposed.
The Confession Beads was the weapon she’d brought to use on Mannes, but she was broken, and could not use it. She kept it back in her bag, with tears falling from her eyes. Without wasting much time, she arranged her load in a bag; wrote a letter, which she kept on the parlour table; and carried her little boy. Then she shut the door and kept the key in the flower vase at the front of the house, and departed.

CHAPTER TWO
OPERATION RESTORE HOPE DAY

January 22, 1913
Luckily for the people of Pine Field, January 22, 1913 happened to be a Saturday. On this day the Organization Operation Restore Hope formerly kicked-off as an organization created for the well-being of the American people; concentrating more on those living in Palm Field. It is ORH one hundred and twenty-ninth year, and 1913 will make it Jack’s tenth year in office. Almost everyone went to the village hall to celebrate ORH Day. The hall was filled with children and adult, as many didn’t go to work.
This year’s celebration was deemed special because Jack invited the Mayor of Augusta. It was the Mayor’s first time of coming to Pine Field. Jack also promised to award the best student in each class in the village school. For the first time since the history of the organization, the Press will be there. Mr. Mannes, who is an editor of Augusta Truth Newspaper, was present with a photographer to cover the story. He was being assisted by Mrs. Vivien, who also works in Augusta Truth. The two were willing to make the story appear on the front cover of the newspaper the next day.
The celebration started by 10 a.m. and was to last for four hours. It started with the singing of The American Anthem, followed by the Organization Anthem, which was written by David Robinson, the leader of the organization then in 1873; but was composed by Miss Gladys, one of the village school teachers at that time. This anthem was known by every pupil and student in the village, because it was always sung every morning.
By 11:15 a.m. Jack Bright was invited to the podium to read the history of the organization. He thanked the people once more for coming to the ceremony. Then he opened the book in his hand that contains the history of the organization, and started reading:
The Thirteen Colonies tried to maintain their stand for complete freedom after their independence in July 4, 1776. But a war broke out as their colonial power still wanted to get a full grip on them (the colonies) that declared themselves independent of Britain. But the little child felt she was strong enough to withstand the armies of King George III of England.
George Washington, a man of courage from his youth became the leader of the Thirteen Colonies, and he and his unskilled soldiers put on the arm of courage to withstand the great colonial power. The British—American war had started. Some men called “Minute men,” in April, 1775, attacked some British soldiers in Boston at Lexington. France who had been a long time enemy of Britain, helped colonist to defeat Britain: so they sent 6000 fleet of troops. The colonist then won major victory at 1777 in Saratoga.
In 1778, Spain joined the colonist to help defeat Britain. In 1780, Netherlands joined: all were for the colonist. But in 1781, colonist army rushed southward to Yorktown, Virginia. There the lord of British army Charles Cornwallis surrendered. At last the soldiers of she that was called ‘great,’ started a song, “The World Turned Upside Down” as they matched out of the Thirteen Colonies.
Bunyan a faithful officer of the 13 Colonies and also a relative of the force head, obeyed all command given by his relative, and they both, with the others won the major battle in 1777. So they were able to push out the colonial power from having any grip on them.
In the late 18th century, two years after the lord of the British army surrendered, Bunyanwas riding on his horse back to his village Pine Field which is in, Maine (at that time, Maine was part of Massachusetts;) when he met his old friend Mr. Kennedy. The two friends, who had not seen each other since the war started, exclaimed as they embraced each other like the prodigal son embraced his father!
Two days after Bunyan’s return, Mr. Kennedy brought a book he wrote (two years ago) which he titled, “Operation Restore Hope.” He then told him his plans of ‘restoring hope after the war.’ But Bunyan felt it will be better to call it “A Better World,” because of his idea of developing a better world. So they titled it, “Operation Restore Hope for a Better Tomorrow.” And they both discussed on how an organization will be formed (until it became dark). Then Mr. Kennedy left the book with Bunyan.
When it was night, Bunyan wrote with ink his thoughts and plans concerning the (dream) organization and how it will be formed. He also wrote about the benefit it will bring to the village. At first, he realized that if an established government is to be formed in the country, it cannot do its best for the rural dwellers except a committee be set up to stand for each village.
At noon the next day, Bunyan went to the inn to meet Mr. Kennedy. In the inn they talked on their new ideas, and after consuming five bottles of dry gin, Richard came in (for he had just arrived from Birmingham, England) after a business. Soon there were shouts of joy and great happiness in the inn. Richard then told the inn boy to serve everyone present a glass of vino.
While the three friends talked loudly about their past years, the inn boy was busy counting the glasses of wine he gave to all the people in the inn based on Mr. Richard’s command, so as to calculate the exact amount that he should be given.
Richard then saw the book that was written by Mr. Kennedy, on the table. He being a voracious reader, asked for it. But Bunyan told him all that the book contains and why it was written.
Soon they all agreed that the book should be published. After Richard had scanned through it, they left the inn. As they talked on their way home, Richard brought out his own idea about the (dream) organization, and it was all centred on how they will make money from it. On getting home, he settled down to read it, and he also added his idea into the book.
After the trio had gathered in the inn the following day, Richard told them more concerning his plans for their dream organization. He said, “I don’t want this organization to exist only in this village, I also want it to spread to all parts of the country and even to the whole world. So we need to work hard so as to see the progress of our dream child.”
The two others were thrilled by what Richard said. Then Bunyan said, “It is true the organization needs to exist all over the world, but we need to start from this village before it spreads its wings beyond the borders of our country. I tell you, we will be great and will be the presidents of this great organization. We will be counting money.”
“Ha! Ha! Ha!” Richard and Bunyan laughed
“Shut up fools!” shouted Mr. Kennedy. “Why build ye castle in the air when it has no foundation? Don’t laugh when the organization has not been given birth to. What we are to talk about is how the organization is going to take a start.”
“It has already taken a start here, now!” said Richard as he laughed.
“Well, I can see that rum is working in your head, let’s end the talk for today. We will meet in Richard’s vineyard tomorrow; lest rum speak for us instead of our heads. As from tomorrow, we will think and plan how to start the organization,” said Bunyan.
As soon as it was noon the next day which was a Wednesday, Mr. Kennedy and Bunyan went to Richard’s compound. At that time, Richard was the richest man in Maine, he had built a vineyard and two gardens in his magnificent compound, and he was the only one who had a swimming pool in the village. The two friends were then ushered to where Richard was sitting. As they sat down, one of Richard’s servants brought a big jug of orange juice, and fifteen boiled eggs for them all; not long, another one brought cheese. Because of these, Kennedy said, “I pray you don’t kill us with food. At these ages, what have we to do with fifteen eggs?”
Richard’s wife and three children (a boy and two girls,) were still in England were they had the opportunity to see the queen. After much talk, Bunyan said that he will need travel to meet his relative George Washington, who was commissioned by the Continental Congress in June, 1775 to lead Continental Army, for a certificate of approval. But those with him doubted that he is a relative of Washington. To clear their doubt, he told them how his family moved to Maine when he was twelve years old—because his father got a job as a lumberjack. Since Richard is wealthy and influential, he thought it best to go with Bunyan for the certificate that will make the organization a legal one.
“Ever since I came to this village, I loved it because you are all of one heart. So I took you people as mine,” said Bunyan.
The certificate will be of a great importance: for it not to seem as if Bunyan and his friends are trying to create a government, they went for it with this reason: “If we Americans are to rule ourselves by having a government of our own which I pray for, our government cannot be able to do her best for the rural dwellers. This is the reason for the organization.”
It was in the month of September that year 1783 that the United States won treaty recognizing her independence. But the country did not have a president until 1789 when George Washington entered office.
The two men came back to the village after three weeks of travel with their request granted, and Mr. Kennedy was thankful to God that the organization has gained approval. The trio then gathered some men in the village to tell them about their dream organization, and also show them the certificate of approval which has the signature and stamp of G. Washington on it. With this impressed on the hearts of the people, the few copies of the already published book, was distributed to the men gathered.
Everybody in the village were happy about the organization that was about to start. In a short time, more copies of the book were printed and distributed to all homes in the village, including those of illiterates; and this project was taken care of financially by Mr. Richard. A call was then made for every male above the age of twenty to gather in Richard’s compound, and they did respond. While some (who had not entered the compound before now) were talking about his wealth, others talked of his fifteen horses and influence; until the meeting started. At the end of the meeting, they concluded by saying that the organization will be built in the village, and its goal is to develop it and help the poor. That day they made the three men these leaders: Mr. Kennedy was made the overseer of all the affairs concerning it; Bunyan is to be the director; while Richard is to be the financial manager.
On January 22, 1784 the organization was established, and it took care of many issues affecting the village. Its success made everyone happy; even family problems like broken homes, strong disputes between husband and wives, and land problems were settled by the organization.
Most of the problems were settled by the village judge Clifford White, while others were settled by the counsellor Donald Everton. Some of the villagers that had nothing doing were given jobs in the organization, wells were dug, and some of the roads that were bad were repaired. The poor were being cared for, and they had their bad roofs changed.Above all, a health centre was built.
Other neighbouring villages heard about the organization and its good works, and some of them paid a visit our village. They were thrilled concerning the good works the organization was doing in the village. One great importance of the organization is that it helped to improve the village commercially by reducing the prices of things in the market.
The wife and children of Richard did return from England after their long stay, and they brought along with them gifts which were given to them by the queen. On getting to the village, Mrs. Richard was surprised to see the changes that have taken place in it; and when she inquired, she was told about the organization. Richard’s wife, a proud, stingy and beautiful woman, was angry when she heard that her husband is the financial bone of the organization and the poor in the village.
She is the daughter of a British lord. After her marriage to Richard, the couple went to America and settled there. She had wanted her husband to remain in England, but Richard would not because of his love for his country. Richard got part of his riches from his wife’s father. First, he worked for him while he was sent on a four year special mission to America by the English Queen. As a result of Richard’s faithfulness, he was taken to England at the end of his master’s mission in the 13 Colonies. In England, Richard noticed a strong feeling of love for his master’s daughter: and this feeling was returned by the lady who could not hold it. After three years in England, his master set him free and rewarded him adequately because of his hard work and sincerity to duty.He then settled in Birmingham. Some years later, he returned for the only girl he ever loved. In spite of class differences they got married in winter. The tale of their marriage is a different episode.
Each time Richard travels for business, when coming back, he buys things to be sold in the village market. A part of the profit was being used by the organization, while he spent the other part on his family. This method that he employed was what sustained the organization. He was working on how to make the organization have a share in his business and it was gradually working out for him.
Money was one of the major obstacles that hindered the fast growth of the organization. Since Richard was the only one that was catering for the huge needs of the people, and also paying the salaries of some of her (the organization’s) workers, it became difficult for him to also pay his servants.
In order to deliver himself from the burden, he met three of his rich friends in New York and introduced the organization to them (for they were his business partners.) These men promised to help him run the organization. This he did so that the organization can spread to other places before he can make profit out of it. The profit he and his two friends are to make will come from the money that will be paid the headquarters by its various branches.
Collateral was demanded by the three men before they can start working for the progress of the organization: in case the organization fails to yield profit. And a day was fixed for the men to visit the village so as to sign an agreement and seal the collateral that Richard signed to give to them if no success is seen at the end of ten years. The collateral was revealed to no one —for it is Richard’s magnificent house. The three men and Richard met and planned on how to make the organization great. Their plans were great and will work effectively if followed.
When Richard returned to the village, he told his two friends of his new plans concerning the organization. While they were discussing, four men were ushered in by a servant. The four visitors told the trio all they heard concerning the organization and how they want it established in their city. This was agreed upon and they told the four men to return at the end of one month.
After the men had gone, Richard and the others were happy, but Richard’s wife knew nothing about the new progress. Soon confusion crept into their heads as they thought about the money that was required for the huge projects. It was then Richard discovered that the date he fixed for the men from New York to come was the same date fixed for the other men who are his business partners to come. “But how was this mistake made, and how can it be corrected?” he asked himself.
Before those who wants the organization to be formed in their city can have their desire established, Richard told them that they need to pay to him the money needed for the project. But the men told the trio (organization leaders) that they will raise half of the money first. Once the project is halfway into completion, they will pay the other half. For the four men to be sure that the leaders of the organization will keep to their promise of establishing the organization in their city, they told them that they will give to them an equivalent of the money they will pay to them: should in case they were disappointed. Richard then told the men that he will use his house as collateral, but didn’t make it known to any that he had earlier promised to use it according to the demand of his business partners in New York.
Two days before the appointment day, Richard who had a dicky heart, fell ill (which was believed to have been caused by the consumption of too many eggs). No day passed by without him eating at least three eggs. He had a poultry farm at the back of his house and so was always supplied with eggs. He had earlier been treated of a similar problem, and the doctor told him to cut down his consumption from five to two weekly. His doctor wanted him to do without egg for about a month or two, but his love for eggs would not allow him. Rather he reduce his egg consumption from five to three daily as he said, “Egg is my life.” Before he was taken to the hospital, he gave up the ghost.
The sudden death of Richard brought shock to everyone in the village. His son said that on his dying bed, he was confessing his sins and spoke words not easily understood. All his friends and some of his business partners around were present the next day as the news spread far and near. His house was then filled with mourners who came to comfort the wife of the deceased.
On the appointed day, the deceased friends from New York and the other four who want the organization to be formed in their city came to seal the deal. This is to lay claim to the collateral before depositing the money they promised Richard before his death. And they were taken to meet Bunyan and Mr. Kennedy. But they saw them in bitterness of heart. It was at this point that the men from New York made known to the two their plans with their late friend. Headache came into their heads as they heard it. One, Mrs. Richard will not allow her house to be used as collateral. Two, she has no interest in the organization.
“I wonder why Richard never made this known to us!” said Bunyan concerning the collateral that Richard promised to give to the different set of men. “Yet let’s give it a trial.”
And they went to the house of their deceased friend. It was the second time in that day that Bunyan and Kennedy were visiting the house. The men from New York were then introduced as well as the four others, before the reason behind their coming was let out of the bag. Like they expected, Mrs. Richard laughed over it thinking that these men came to rob her with ‘lies.’ And she was ready to protect her husband’s wealth. To this end, the woman told them to leave her house; calling them thieves, or else they will be thrown out by her servants. Again Richard’s wife could not help the organization because her husband didn’t leave anything for it in his will. If only Richard had not died, he could have been able to use his house as collateral to the two set of men despite the similarity in date, without their knowledge.
Outside the compound, the men spoke about her rude nature, but Mr. Ken

Order Now
Price: ₦500 ($3)
Qty:
Product Details
Author: Joshua Egbon
More About This eBook
Overview
When the footprint of seven-year-old Joseph “Joe” Mannes was seen on the blood of a dead man, Jack, his life was forever changed: not really because he was thought to be the murderer, but because he soon lost both parents, and became a wanderer; fearing to return to the village where his trouble began, until he was accepted into the home of a stranger, Mr. Wilson, in the village of Horse Track.

There Joe almost met his death when he was attacked by seven black wolves, but was saved by a mysterious woman who called herself a SOUL (Sister of the Ultimate Light). She made him to understand the confusions in his life, and also added that soon nowhere would be safe for him, because the Master of the Black Wolves, Robert Thompson, who was the true murderer of Jack, and also the one that made Joe lose both parents, had caught his scent, and would be out to destroy him.
Editorial Reviews
About Author
JOSHUA EGBON is a Nigeria, who was born in Delta State. He graduated from Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, where he studied Mechanical Engineering. His hobbies include reading, singing, and writing.



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought
Ify Tony-Monye
₦500 ($3)
Udeme Umoh
₦500 ($3)
Lilian Amah
₦500 ($3)
Lawrence Olaolu Ayeni
₦500 ($3)
Oboh Aghogho
₦500 ($3)
Olive Lawino
₦500 ($3)
Charles Mgbolu
₦500 ($3)
Osasu Omoragbon
₦500 ($3)
Tolulope Popoola
₦500 ($3)
Dan Abubakar
₦500 ($3)
Tolulope Popoola
₦500 ($3)
Michael Shina Crown
₦500 ($3)
Nkem Akin
₦500 ($3)
Customer Reviews
Web of Broken Vendetta
4 Total Reviews
Rating Distribution
5 Star:
i
(2)
4 Star:
i
(2)
3 Star:
i
(0)
2 Star:
i
(0)
1 Star:
i
(0)
Here you can review this item.
Your name / nickname:
Your review:
Tips:
- Review the product itself, not our service
- Write what you like about the item
- Write what you don't like about it
- Describe some of the features, the cover, the content etc
- Give as much detail as possible to help other customers decide
- Be honest - bad reviews and good reviews are equally valuable
Rating:


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful

Tuesday, October 28th 2014

By AUGUSTA OSAZUWA

I AM ONE OF D EARLY BUYERS OF THIS BOOK. FROM WHAT I READ, D STORY IS CAPTIVATING, AND ALL I CAN SAY IS 'JOSEPH MANNES, I LUV U.' I CAN'T WAIT FOR BK 2...

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you?      

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful

Wednesday, November 12th 2014

By Adewale Shoola

Great book, very inspiring

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you?      

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful

Wednesday, November 12th 2014

By Labos Bob

Great and inspiring book

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you?      

Sunday, November 27th 2016

By Obike Chimdindu Jando

Great Book... You just need to get a copy and enjoy the inspirational story

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you?